Oct 26

How to: Change your activation product key in Windows 8, Windows 2012 Server and MultiPoint Server 2012

How to: Change your activation product key in Windows 8, Windows 2012 Server and MultiPoint Server 2012

When you try to activate your Windows 8, Windows 2012 Server or MultiPoint Server 2012 sometimes you have a pre-set key (trial, etc.) which won’t let you activate your windows installation. There are other scenarios where you might want to change your product key (licensing, feature set, etc.) but unfortunately you can’t even though the system is throwing you errors that it can’t activate, etc. If you go to the System item in the Control Panel as before, you’ll see the “Change product key” link is not there anymore.

Fortunately there are other ways to get that Windows Activation // Enter a product key to activate Windows dialog box. Below are the two methods published by Microsoft on how to do this:

Method 1

  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.
  2. In the search box, type Slui 3.
    2917616
  3. Tap or click the Slui 3 icon.
  4. Type your product key in the Windows Activation window, and then click Activate.
    2917617

Method 2

  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.
  2. Type Command Prompt in the Search box.
    2917618
  3. Right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or click Allow.
    2917619
  4. Run the following command at the elevated command prompt:
    slmgr.vbs /ipk <Your product key>

Note You can also use the Volume Activation Management Tool (VAMT) 3.0 to change the product key remotely, or if you want to change the product key on multiple computers.

Oct 26

How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation – Office 2016 version

How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation – Office 2016 version

For those of you who have read our previous post: How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation, you know what this is all about. For those of you that haven’t:

Shared computer activation lets you to deploy Office 365 ProPlus to a computer in your organization that is accessed by multiple users.

Shared computer activation gets enabled during the installation of Office 365 ProPlus, Project Pro for Office 365 and Visio Pro for Office 365 using the Office Deployment Tool. Once enabled, Office installs without being activated. When a user signs in to a computer with Office installed via shared computer activation, Office will check to see if the user has been provisioned for Office 365 ProPlus and temporarily activates Office 365 ProPlus. If a second user signs in to the same computer, the activation does not persist from the first user and process is repeated.

So there you have it. We love shared computer activation as it allows us to deploy Office 365 to Windows Server and Windows MultiPoint Server, allowing us to offer the latest Office experience to our licensed Office 365 users. Not only that, but it does not count against the user’s 5 total installations!

It’s also important to note that deploying Office 365 ProPlus using shared computer activation does not count against a user’s five total installations of Office 365 ProPlus or Office for Mac.


So now that we have tauted the features we like the most, it is time to get to work. From the title you may gather that this installation instructions are meant to be used in connection with an Office 365 subscription and for the deployment of Office 2016. If you would like to deploy Office 2013, please see our previous post referenced on the top of this article as the steps change a little and the Office Deployment Tool referenced here is exclusively for Office 2016.

Here are the steps to deploy Office 365 with Shared Computer Activation.

I.   Download the Office 2016 Deployment Tool for Click-to-Run: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=49117

II.  After downloading the tool, run OfficeDeploymentTool.exe

III. Extract the files to a drive on your computer

7474-21

IV. You’ll end up with 2 files (Setup.exe and Configuration.xml)

7474-31

V.   Edit and configure the configuration XML file. I am showing an example below. Change the SourcePath to your network share. Also, Consider I already added the Small Business Premium Retail Product ID and the Spanish language. This is not necessary. Simply pick from those two product IDs which one you want and then add the languages you wish to install. In my case it was English AND Spanish, so both versions get installed. 

<Configuration>

<Add SourcePath=”\\DomainName\DFS\o365\” OfficeClientEdition=”32″ >

<Product ID=”O365ProPlusRetail”>

<Language ID=”en-us” />

<Language ID=”es-es” />

</Product>

<Product ID=”O365SmallBusPremRetail”>

<Language ID=”en-us” />

<Language ID=”es-es” />

</Product>

</Add>

<Property Name=”SharedComputerLicensing” Value=”1″ />

</Configuration>

 VI.  From an elevated Command Prompt, run Setup to download the installation files. Please note that there is no GUI / progress bar / etc. to get you know how it is doing. You can check the network share to see if the space used to see if it has have been downloaded or not (at the time of writing it is 1.02gb, could be more or less in the future.)

Setup.exe /download configuration.xml

VII.  From an elevated Command Prompt, run Setup to install Office Click-to-Run.

Setup.exe /configure configuration.xml

VIII. You’re done!

I recommend you read more on this topic. Using the Deployment Tool you can also deploy Office 365 / Office 2016 Enterprise Wide using Group Policy in Active Directory, etc.


Update:

You can use the following XML which is meant to only active Shared Licensing mode (no extra languages, no network share, no extra office products, etc.) Now you can skip the /download command straight to the /configure command. You will need an internet connection as it will download from the web the installation files to deploy Office365 on the system.

<Configuration>
<Product ID=”O365ProPlusRetail”>
<Language ID=”en-us” />
</Product>
</Add>
<Display Level=”None” AcceptEULA=”True” />
<Property Name=”SharedComputerLicensing” Value=”1″ />
</Configuration>

Aug 22

Resolved: Your server may not be able to connect to sites running on it. Error message: SSL certificate problem: self signed certificate

Resolved: Your server may not be able to connect to sites running on it. Error message: SSL certificate problem: self signed certificate

So recently I ran across an error while performing a WordPress Update. Usually after you perform an update, you are taken to a screen to individually update all your subsites (I am guessing to update the database schema they are running under.) Not sure why this isn’t done at the get go but surely there is a reason for it. So the problem was that several subsites did update without much problem but then one of them caused the process to stop and showed the following error below:

Your server may not be able to connect to sites running on it. Error message: SSL certificate problem: self signed certificate

I am not certain what this error really means. All my subsites run under the same certificate so why some of them worked and this particular one didn’t is beyond me. We also use two reverse proxies to accelerate our web traffic, and our front end web certificate is signed by a CA of public trust. So it is truly a bizarre situation that didn’t happen before. Fortunately we were able to find a workaround to get the process completed.


Workaround

Unfortunately I am not entirely sure what this workaround does. For that reason my suggestion is that you implement the workaround, perform the update on WordPress, and disable the workaround until you need it again. I suggest this as the implications of the workaround with WordPress as a whole are unknown to me, so this might cause a security risk or problem as it is modifying intended behavior. Please proceed with care as usual.

The key to get this to work as mentioned lies on modifying WordPress behavior. To do so, we are going to rely on the feature called mu-plugins. This is code that is executed when using the multi site plugin / functionality limiting the impact the code may have on other functionality. In order to do achieve this you need to follow this simple steps:

  1. Navigate to the /wp-content/mu-plugins directory in your WordPress install.
  2. Create a php file, you can name it whatever you want. Take upgrade_fix.php for example
  3. Add the following inside the file and you’re done. Save it and retry the upgrade process.
<?php
add_filter('https_ssl_verify', '__return_false');
add_filter('https_local_ssl_verify', '__return_false');
?>

As you can probably tell from it, we are adding filters to bypass SSL verifications. The reason why we chose a MU plugin was so that this change: a) Impacts only multisite functionality and b) Remains in place even after upgrades to WordPress files.

If you look at the /wp-admin/network/upgrade.php file, you’ll see around like 68 something like the following. You need to indicate you don’t want to perform an SSL Verification to avoid getting this error message. Keep in mind the implications of changing this.

$response = wp_remote_get( $upgrade_url, array( ‘timeout’ => 120, ‘httpversion’ => ‘1.1’, ‘sslverify’ => false ) );


 

Solution

The solution probably lies in using a valid public trust certificate for your site. If you can’t afford one, get a test one. If not you are going to need to execute the upgrade against a non SSL site which may carry security implications. So, if for some reason you can’t or don’t want to get a public trust certificate, then go ahead and use the Workaround. Best of luck!

May 30

How to: Place a program´s shortcut for all users desktop or Start Menu

How to: Place a program´s shortcut for all users desktop or Start Menu

All users desktop:
C:\Users\Public\Desktop\

All users start menu:
C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\

 

However, the folder is hidden by default…doesn’t show the public desktop folder by default…..you must show the hidden files and folders.

May 27

How to: Create Web query files for use with Excel for Mac

How to: Create Web query files for use with Excel for Mac

Web queries allow you to query data from a specific World Wide Web, Internet, or intranet site and retrieve the information directly into a Microsoft Excel worksheet. Microsoft Excel includes some sample Web queries.

Definition of a Web Query File

A Web query file is a text file that contains from one to four lines of text. You can create Web query files in any text editor, such as SimpleText or TextEdit (with preferences set to text).

Note You must save query files as text files with no formatting. Rich Text Format (RTF) files are not recognized.

Web query files are saved in the following folder on your computer’s hard disk:

Microsoft Office 2001:Office:Queries

-or-

Microsoft Office X/Office/Queries (in Mac OS X)

How to Create a Web Query File

To create a Web query file, follow these steps:

  1. Start a text editor, such as SimpleText or TextEdit (with preferences set to text).
  2. Type the four lines of text in the text editor; use the following information:

    First Line: Type of Query

    The first line in the Web query file tells Microsoft Excel what type of query the file contains. At this time, the following are the only valid query types:

    WEB
    <line omitted>

    If you omit the line, WEB is the assumed value.

    Second Line: Version of Query

    The second line of a Web query file tells Microsoft Excel what version of the query is being executed. At this time, the following are the only valid versions:

    1
    <line omitted>

    Note If you specify the type of query in the first line, you must specify a version in the second line. If you omit the type, you must also omit the version.

    Third Line: Uniform Resource Locator (URL)

    The third line of a Web query file determines the Web document on which the query acts. Unless the Web document is a POST type (see the “Fourth Line: POST Parameters” section), this information is the only required value in the Web query file.

    Type the URL in one of the following formats.

          File location                   URL format
          -------------------------------------------------------
          Web document                    http://<server>/<file>
          File stored locally             <drive>:<folder>:<file>
          File stored on a network        <drive>:<folder>:<file>
    

    where file is the name of the document, drive is the drive that contains the file, and folder is the folder name that contains the file.

    Fourth Line: POST Parameters

    The fourth line of a Web query file contains POST parameters. Note that this line is optional and must be included only if the third line (the URL) exceeds 200 characters in length as a result of adding parameters.

    When you query a Web document for information, the parameters sent to the Web document can be sent in one of two ways: GET or POST.

    When you use the GET method, data values are included in the same line as the URL. The following example illustrates how to type the line

    http://server/file?parameters

    where server is the name of the server that contains the Web document, and file is the name of the document.

    When you use the POST method, data values are sent in a separate line. The following example illustrates how to type the line

    http://server/file parameters

    where server is the name of the server that contains the Web document, and file is the name of the document.

  3. After you type all the required lines, save the new file as a text file in the following folder:
    Microsoft Office 2001:Office:Queries

    -or-

    Microsoft Office X/Office/Queries (in Mac OS X)

  4. Quit the text editor.
  5. Use Finder to navigate to the saved text file.
  6. Click the file name to highlight the name of the file in the a box.

    Note Do not open the file.

  7. Change the file extension from .txt to .iqy, and then click in an area outside the box to complete the change. When you are prompted to, select Keep .iqy.

Note If you do not change the file extension to .igy the Web query will appear in the list when you click Data, click Get External Data, and then click Run saved query. However, the query will be dimmed and you will not be able to select it.

How to Use Static and Dynamic Parameters in a Web Query

In Web queries, you can use both static and dynamic parameters. Static parameters send query data without prompting you for any values. Dynamic parameters prompt you to type one or more values when the Web query run.

The syntax for parameters is as follows

parameter=value string

where parameter is the name of a parameter (for example, stock) and value string is a value.

The value string can be one of the following values:

   Parameter type   Value string
   -----------------------------------------------------------
   Static           value1
   Dynamic          ["value1","Please enter the first value:"]

In the dynamic value string, the first argument (value1) is the name of the value to be entered. The second argument is the message that appears when the Web query is executed.

If multiple parameters are required, separate them with an ampersand character (&). The following example illustrates the syntax:

quote1=stock1″e2=stock2

When multiple values are sent for a single parameter, separate them with a plus sign (+). The following example illustrates the syntax:

quote1=stock1+stock2&quote2=stock3+stock4

You can combine static and dynamic parameters within a single parameter string. The following example illustrates the syntax:

quote1=stock1&quote2=[“stock2″,”Please enter the second value:”]

Examples of Web Query Files

The following examples demonstrate the syntax used by Web query files.

Note The following examples may not be functional Web queries.

Example 1:

This example sends the value “aapl” to the web page and retrieves a value. You are not prompted to type any values. This example sends the parameter by using the GET method.

WEB
1
http://finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=aapl

If you like, you can omit the first two lines and use the following line:

http://finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=aapl

 

Note It is acceptable to omit the first two lines when you create the Web query file. You can also omit these lines for all of the examples shown in this article.

Example Two:

This example sends the values for which quotes and the format and then retrieves values. You are not prompted to type any values. This example sends the parameters by using the POST method.

WEB
1
http://finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=aapl&f=sl1

Example Three:

This example prompts you to type a stock symbol, sends that symbol to the website, and retrieves a value. This examples sends the parameters by using the GET method.

Note Type the third and fourth lines of this example on a single line in your text file.

WEB
1
http://finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=[“stock1″,”Please enter a stock symbol:”]&&f=sl1

 

May 17

How to: Erase a log file in Ubuntu

How to: Erase a log file in Ubuntu

Ever had this huge error log, full of nightmares and bad memories? Well, once you’re done fixing the problems then you’re stuck with megs if not gigs worth of bad memories that perhaps you wish to get rid off. Well, in my case one of my errors sent so much information to the log file it was on the gigs arena. This obviously becomes an issue as much of that information is not important to me any more and it can have a performance impact on the system.

Usually I would move the original file to a backup location and create a new one. The issue with this approach is that the permissions or attributes of the original file need to be copied over to the new one… more work basically. So I did some research and it is possible to simply truncate your log file so that all you’re doing is getting rid of the data within and keeping all the attributes and the like untouched.

There are a couple of ways to do this: You can do some fancy output redirection or you could use the truncate command. Either way the result is the same and all it takes is one command line. Here it goes:

Option 1: Redirect output to the file to clear it:

If you simply redirect null output to the file, basically you’re wiping it clean. Simply do the following:

>error.log

Option 2: Use the truncate command:

For those who feel more at home with a traditional command instead of ninja magic:

truncate -s0 error.log

May 17

Resolved: [hphp] Warning: Parameter 1 to W3_Plugin_TotalCache::ob_callback() expected to be a reference, value given in /wp-includes/functions.php on line 3282

Resolved: [hphp] Warning: Parameter 1 to W3_Plugin_TotalCache::ob_callback() expected to be a reference, value given in /wp-includes/functions.php on line 3282

As you probably know (otherwise you would probably not be here), after deciding to move form PHP to HHVM, if you are running a WordPress site and use W3 Total Cache you will encounter an endless number of errors all revolving ob_callback() expecting a reference:

[Sun May 17 18:41:51 2015] [hphp] [14300:7ff40dfff700:39:000001] [] \nWarning: Parameter 1 to W3_Plugin_TotalCache::ob_callback() expected to be a reference, value given in /wp-includes/functions.php on line 3282

I have good and bad news for you. The good news is that there is a fix for this (yay!) The bad news is that next time you update or re-install W3 Total Cache you might or will need to perform this fix again. I know, it is a pain but thus far this is the best answer I could find (or rather, the only one).

So basically what we are going to do is fix some W3 Total Cache php code so that this warning does not show again. I recommend you back up your system just in case something goes wrong; and by system I think just your plugins directory or the file we are going to modify should suffice.

The file we need to modify is located here (relatively speaking, change /var/www/ for your site’s actual www root):

/var/www/wp-content/plugins/w3-total-cache/lib/W3/Plugin/TotalCache.php

Now, one you have opened the file on your favorite text editor (say nano), look for the following line (for me it is on line 512):

function ob_callback(&$buffer) {

The key here is to change the parameter to just $buffer, like so:

function ob_callback($buffer) {

This should take care of the issue. If you look at the error log (/var/log/hhvm/error.log) you’ll notice. In my case I had several messages per second so with tail -f /var/log/hhvm/error.log you can tell it is working. Hope this worked for you too!

Mar 02

How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation – Office 2013 version

How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation – Office 2013 version

Here you can find the Office 2016 version/instructions: How to: Install Office 365 ProPlus / Business on a RDS Server (Terminal Server / MultiPoint Server) using Shared Computer Activation – Office 2016 version

I know that title just reads like a mouthful but trust me, could not think of a better one that would let the user know how to install Office 365 in say MultiPoint Server 2012. We’ve been promoting MultiPoint Server as an alternative to the traditional desktop model as even older desktops running even Ubuntu if licensing costs are an issue can serve as terminal (thin clients). On other scenarios, we have the Remote App functionality on a Windows Server. However, the only way to install Office on a Server product (Windows Server / Terminal Server, MultiPoint Server, etc.) was to install via a Volume License Key. So, what about those of us who purchased through either Open, Open Value, etc. several copies of Office? Well, as far as I knew we were all out of luck. Fortunately that has recently changed. Microsoft released late last year Office 365 Shared Computer Activation. This bring several advantages to companies using Office 365, but the most noteworthy obviously is the ability to use Office 365 on a Windows Server. Note: Back then the only supported product was Office 365 ProPlus, so for those of us with Office 365 Business we are not officially supported. I believe I figured out how to get it working but I will confirm once I have an Office 365 Business user up and running.

Shared computer activation lets you to deploy Office 365 ProPlus to a computer in your organization that is accessed by multiple users.

Shared computer activation gets enabled during the installation of Office 365 ProPlus, Project Pro for Office 365 and Visio Pro for Office 365 using the Office Deployment Tool. Once enabled, Office installs without being activated. When a user signs in to a computer with Office installed via shared computer activation, Office will check to see if the user has been provisioned for Office 365 ProPlus and temporarily activates Office 365 ProPlus. If a second user signs in to the same computer, the activation does not persist from the first user and process is repeated.

So there is the second beauty of Shared Computer Activation: The Activation does not persist. You can imagine what Microsoft decades ago would have done, making you use one of your precious computer quotas on each of the shared computers. But thankfully they thought really how in certain scenarios having the activation persist would result in people not adopting the shared computer model or purchasing Office 365.

It’s also important to note that deploying Office 365 ProPlus using shared computer activation does not count against a user’s five total installations of Office 365 ProPlus or Office for Mac.


Here are the steps to deploy Office 365 with Shared Computer Activation.

I. Download the Office Deployment Tool for Click-to-Run: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36778

II. Run and extract the tool to a folder on your computer or preferably prepare a network share if you are deploying this enterprise wide.

III. Edit and configure the configuration XML file as follows: (change the SourcePath to your network share. Also, Consider I already added the Small Business Premium Retail Product ID and the Spanish language. This is not necessary)

<Configuration>

<Add SourcePath=”\\DomainName\DFS\o365\” OfficeClientEdition=”32″ >

<Product ID=”O365ProPlusRetail”>

<Language ID=”en-us” />

<Language ID=”es-es” />

</Product>

<Product ID=”O365SmallBusPremRetail”>

<Language ID=”en-us” />

<Language ID=”es-es” />

</Product>

</Add>

<Property Name=”SharedComputerLicensing” Value=”1″ />

</Configuration>

 IV. From an elevated Command Prompt, run Setup to download the installation files. Please note that there is no GUI / progress bar / etc. to get you know how it is doing. You can check the network share to see if the 1.02gb have been downloaded or not (at the time of writing it is 1.02gb, could be more or less in the future.)

Setup.exe /download configuration.xml

 

V. From an elevated Command Prompt, run Setup to install Office Click-to-Run.

Setup.exe /configure configuration.xml

VI. You’re done!

I recommend you read more on this topic. Microsoft has the following 4 resources I found very helpful in figuring this out:

Mar 02

How to: Create a Self-Signed SAN Certificate on PowerShell

How to: Create a Self-Signed SAN Certificate on PowerShell

In the past I have wrote about creating self signed certificates on different architectures as well as creating SAN (Subject Alternative Name) Certificates. The main twist is always how to create SAN certificates as the need for them seems to be on the rise. In case you are not familiar, a SAN certificate in simple terms is one certificate which can be used for more than one thing. A regular certificate only protects one domain or a very particular DNSName, for example: KX. CloudIngenium.com. Modern day CAs will issue certificates for the root domain “CloudIngenium.com” and the subdomain “Kx. CloudIngenium.com”. So if you wanted to protect www.CloudIngenium.com or www.JCBauza.com, you would need a separate certificate. Using SANs you can include additional DNSNames you want your certificate to be good for. But I digress.

Getting back on topic, in Windows 8 (or Windows Server 2012) using PowerShell there is a new command at your disposal for creating Self Signed Certificates. This used to be somewhat of a pain, but Microsoft finally wrapped it all up in one nice PowerShell commandlet for you: New-SelfSignedCertificate. Isn’t that awesome!

So, easy as you would expect, here is the syntax:

Syntax:

New-SelfSignedCertificate [-CertStoreLocation <String>] [-CloneCert <Certificate>] [-DnsName <String>] [-Confirm <SwitchParameter>] [-WhatIf <SwitchParameter>] [<CommonParameters>]

To make the magic happen, all you really need is the -DnsName and the -CertStoreLocation. Providing those two parameters you will be golden. One thing to keep in mind is that the first DnsName you provide is going to be the Common Name of the certificate, so you might want to pick that one. Here is one example if you want to get started:

NewSelfSignedCertificateDnsName cloudingenium.com, *.cloudingenium.com, JCBauza.com, *.JCBauza.com –CertStoreLocation cert:\LocalMachine\My

Once done, you will get an output confirming the location the certificate was placed as well as the Thumbprint and Common Name/Subject of the new certificate:

Directory: Microsoft.PowerShell.Security\Certificate::LocalMachine\My

Thumbprint                                 Subject

———-                                 ——-

10E0CC054B5818262CJF6C7D9BB2E2546A2B4BC8 CN=CloudIngenium.com

So, voilá! It even gets it installed on your local certificate store (as indicated by the CertStoreLocation parameter.

As with any self signed certificate, they are not trusted by any computer. If you need to avoid those warnings while you perform your tests using the certificate, you will need to add it to the Trusted Root CA store of each computer that is going to access the (web)server using that certificate. Simply export your certificate using the Certificate MMC (you don’t need to export the private key + it is no recommended you do so for this exercise) and then import it into the Trusted Root CA store of each computer.

Below is the general help available for the command in case you are curious about how to tweak the parameters:

New-SelfSignedCertificate Help

Description

        The New-SelfSignedCertificate cmdlet creates a self-signed certificate for testing purposes. Using the CloneCert parameter, a test certificate can be created based on an existing certificate with all settings copied from the original certificate except for the public key. A new key of the same algorithm and length will be created.

        If an existing certificate is not being cloned, then an SSL server certificate with the following default settings is created:

  • Subject:   Empty
  • Key:   RSA 2048
  • EKUs:   Client Authentication and Server Authentication
  • Key Usage:   Digital Signature, Key Encipherment (a0)
  • Validity Period:   One year

Delegation may be required when using this cmdlet with Windows PowerShell® remoting and changing user configuration.

Parameters

CertStoreLocation <String>

        Specifies the certificate store in which a new certificate will be stored. The current path is the default value.

  • Required? False
  • Position? Named
  • Default value .
  • Accept pipeline input? False
  • Accept wildcard characters? False

CloneCert <Certificate>

         Identifies the certificate to copy when creating a new certificate. The certificate being cloned can be identified by an X509 certificate or the file path in the certificate provider. When this parameter is used, all fields and extensions of the certificate will be inherited except the public key (a new key of the same algorithm and length will be created) and the NotAfter and NotBefore fields (the validity period for the NotBefore field is set to ten minutes in the past).

  • Required? False
  • Position? Named
  • Default value
  • Accept pipeline input? true (ByValue)
  • Accept wildcard characters? False

-DnsName <String>

        Specifies one or more DNS names to put into the Subject Alternative Name extension of the certificate when a certificate to be copied is not specified via the CloneCert parameter. The first DNS name is also saved as Subject Name and Issuer Name.

  • Required? False
  • Position? Named
  • Default value
  • Accept pipeline input? False
  • Accept wildcard characters? False

Confirm <SwitchParameter>

        Prompts you for confirmation before running the cmdlet.

  • Required? False
  • Position? Named
  • Default value
  • Accept pipeline input? False
  • Accept wildcard characters? False

WhatIf <SwitchParameter>

        Shows what would happen if the cmdlet runs. The cmdlet is not run.

  • Required? False
  • Position? Named
  • Default value
  • Accept pipeline input? False
  • Accept wildcard characters? False

InputsMicrosoft.CertificateServices.Commands.Certificate

The Certificate object can either be provided as a Path object to a certificate or an X509Certificate2 object.

Outputs

System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates.X509Certificate2

An X509Certificate2 object for the certificate that has been created.

Nov 21

Resolved: Where and How to use Name Management function in Excel 2011 for Mac

Resolved: Where and How to use Name Management function in Excel 2011 for Mac

So this is one of those things I keep referring back to. One of the key things I do when I work in Excel is control the values that can be entered in certain fields. I am clearly not good at remembering possible options and every now and then I have typos. So imagine if you will a Table where I track different things and one of those columns clearly becomes a list of things. So when I am trying to provide a list of possible values for a field, I want it to bind to that column listing the valid options. It makes programatic referencing much more easy. So if you are familiar with the method of “Data Validation” you know you can bind to a list… but a table / column? No. So clearly we are in dire need of binding to a list, but how can we convert the values of a column to a list? Using the Name Management function to define a Name (“list”) which is defined as the values of a column in a table.

Most people know exactly where to find this option on Excel for PC (say Excel 2013). Simply go to Formulas -> Name Management. But where is Name Management exactly on Excel 2011 for Mac? I looked and looked but no luck. This forced me to restudy the situation and find a way to add it to a menu. Fortunately that’s exactly what you need to do, but I am still dumbfounded by it being missing on Excel’s ribbon. But anyway, below are the steps you need to follow in oder to add this to a Menu:

  1. Right-click on the very top toolbar (the regular toolbar, not the ribbon) and then select from the drop down the option: Customise Toolbars and Menus…
  2. In the Commands tab, select All Commands
  3. Find the Define… command (If you start typing after selecting any item on the list it will take you to what you’ve typed)
  4. Click and drag that command from the list onto the toolbar or menu you wish you use.

 

If this is a one time deal or you are more of a shortcut guy, you can open the Name Management function via keyboard shortcut as well: Command-F3. Note that I am using F3, so on a Mac keyboard that is usually 3 keys: Command (The Apple key) + the function key (fn) + F3. If you don’t use the function key it would do the keyboard shortcut drawn on your keyboard. If on System Preferences you already indicated your Mac that you want to treat F1 – F12 as Function keys not fancy control keys then there is no need to hold the function key before hand.

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